Archive | April, 2014

Can the Sands Theatre survive digital conversion?

30 Apr

See on Scoop.itCommunity Revitalization

As cinema goes digital, the longtime standard of 35-millimeter projection is becoming obsolete. The Sands has a pair of immaculate Super Simplex 35-millimeter projectors — Machetta estimates they’re from the late ’30s or early ’40s — that still run smoothly. But while most major studios are still making 35mm prints, they’re becoming harder and harder to find. Soon they’ll disappear altogether. Unless theaters invest in expensive new equipment — digital cinema projection costs upwards of $50,000 per projector — there will simply be no more movies for them to show. The Sands isn’t the only theater on a collision course with technology. Small-town movie houses that managed to survive the rise of the multiplexes, fended off competition from Blockbuster and then fought off Netflix are finding it almost impossible to come up with the cash for the digital conversion.”

Heather Garbo‘s insight:

After learning that small movie theaters across Colorado were being forced to shutter their doors due to the high costs of an industry-wide mandate to convert to digital projectors, Downtown Colorado, Inc. spearheaded a statewide coalition of foundations and agencies to identify funding for theaters and to launch the Save Our Screens campaign.

In many small communities, the local movie theater is not just a small independent business, but also serves a public function as a community gathering place, drawing foot traffic and supporting other businesses and community endeavors.

The Denver Westword’s story, released today, documents the City of Brush’s journey to save their beloved Sands Theatre.

See on www.westword.com

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Transportation For America Survey: To recruit and keep millennials, give them walkable places with good transit and other options

28 Apr

See on Scoop.itCommunity Revitalization

“Four in five millennials say they want to live in places where they have a variety of options to get to jobs, school or daily needs, according to a new survey of Americans age 18-34 in 10 major U.S. cities, released today by The Rockefeller Foundation and Transportation for America.

Three in four say it is likely they will live in a place where they do not need a car to get around. But a majority in all but the largest metros rate their own cities “fair” or “poor” in providing public transportation, and they want more options such as car share and bike share.”

Heather Garbo‘s insight:

According to two separate surveys released this week by Transportation for America and AARP, millennials and aging Americans seek the same things in a community: pedestrian-friendly areas with transportation options. Community leaders who wish to create a multi-generational community should take note!

See on t4america.org

What Does ‘Livable’ Mean to Older Americans?

28 Apr

See on Scoop.itCommunity Revitalization

Nearly 20 percent of Americans will be over 65 by 2030, up from 12 percent in 2009. That boom has been accompanied by the rise of a concept known as “aging in place,” a phrase unknown a generation ago but that has become a common buzzword today. It describes the rising trend toward older people staying put, rather than moving away from the neighborhoods where they’ve spent their younger years.


The AARP is developing a “livability index” to measure whether the country’s neighborhoods are meeting the needs and desires of its older citizens. A new report out today from their Public Policy Institute, “What Is Livable? Community Preferences of Older Adults” is part of that effort.”

Heather Garbo‘s insight:

What do aging community members want to see in their communities? Police presence, improved schools, pedestrian-friendly streets, transportation options, and parks. See what else the AARP uncovered in the recent survey on what livable means to the older generation.

See on www.theatlanticcities.com

Neighborland: A new way for residents to collaborate with local organizations

25 Apr

See on Scoop.itNeighborhood Community-Building

Neighborland empowers people to take action on local issues. We are providing residents, organizations, and city agencies a powerful civic engagement platform designed to move community projects forward.

Heather Garbo‘s insight:

An innovative community engagement tool for both cities and neighborhoods. Neighborland was co-founded by Candy Chang, an artist/urban planner known for her creative interactive installations in communities, such as the community chalkboards featured in cities across the world with the prompt, “Before I die I want to…”

See on neighborland.com

Lisa Gansky and the value capture in the Sharing Economy – OuiShare

23 Apr

See on Scoop.itCommunity Revitalization

Lisa Gansky interviewed on the value capture in the Collaborative Economy and on living a sharing economy life.

Heather Garbo‘s insight:

The concept of a sharing economy lends itself well to building community. After all it’s really just what our grandparents would call being neighborly. From the proverbial lending of a cup of sugar to the tradition of barn-raising, past generations accepted helping out one’s  neighbor and community as a part of life, and recognized how much easier it could make life. Just because you probably don’t need to borrow a cup of sugar or raise a barn doesn’t mean you can’t embrace the traditional neighborly values of a sharing economy: a community garden, a lending tool library, car or bike sharing, or “little free libraries” are all great modern translations of this traditional idea.

I also love how Lisa points out that a sharing economy is a great community engagement tool for community leaders, and can also provide a platform for public-private partnerships between local government and small businesses.

See on magazine.ouishare.net

FILL THAT SPACE: A RESIDENT’S GUIDE TO CREATIVE PLACEMAKING

22 Apr

See on Scoop.itCommunity Revitalization for Downtowns and Districts

FlLL THAT SPACE is the first interactive guide in which residents, artists, community leaders and small business owners can use in order to understand how placemaking can increase the vibrancy of a neighborhood. It is my hope that residents can use the guide as they begin to recognize the creative potential in their neighborhood.

Heather Garbo‘s insight:

Placemaking is not just a concept for community professionals–it is for all of us who love our neighborhoods and want to keep them vibrant and vital places. We all should recognize the important role we can play as community members. That’s why I love that this interactive placemaking guide is specifically targeted to RESIDENTS! The author of Fill That Space: A Resident’s Guide to Creative Placemaking, (released just this month) spearheaded placemaking in her own Washington, D.C. neighborhood and collected her lessons learned into this handy step-by-step guide that is a fantastic little primer for anyone interested in, as the author puts it, “recognizing the creative potential in your own neighborhood.”

See on issuu.com

Resilient Cities: A Grosvenor Research Report

21 Apr

See on Scoop.itCommunity Revitalization for Downtowns and Districts

“At Grosvenor, we realise that a city’s long term success cannot be measured on annual volatility and returns alone. We need to evolve our approach and analyse the risks and opportunities of cities holistically, taking into account their geographical location, governance, predicted population growth and resources, amongst other things. We need to know how vulnerable they are, but also understand their ability to adapt and improve. We need to establish their resilience.”

Heather Garbo‘s insight:

How resilient is your community? How vulnerable is it to environmental, infrastructure or even community setbacks? The newly released Resilient Cities: A Grosvener Research Report indicates that a community’s ability to adapt is based on five key areas: governance, institutions, technical and learning, planning systems, and funding structures. The study focuses on larger cities, but the report provides insight that communities of all sizes can use.

See on www.grosvenor.com